Pipe Spring National Monument

THIS IS LIVING HISTORY. CABINS BUILT BY SETTLERS STAND WITH EXHIBITS DETAILING COWBOY LIFE, A MORMON STRONGHOLD STAYS STRONG, AND THE CORRALS ARE STILL FILLED WITH LIVESTOCK. THESE ARE ONLY A FEW OF THE HISTORICAL MARKERS PRESERVED AT PIPE SPRING. 

History & Nature

In Northern Arizona, Pipe Spring National Monument tells the tumultuous past of the area. American Indian tribes have called this area home for centuries, living off the fresh and abundant waters of Pipe Spring. When members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints began settling the area in the 1850s, the landscape was drastically changed. Conflicts arose and compromises were made as native tribes and settlers navigated the new rules of the expanding southwest.

Right Now

Things to Do

If you can only travel back in time for an hour, then make the visitor center and museum your first stop. Get a thorough education on centuries of people who have been attracted to this area by Pipe Spring’s fresh water.

Got a little more time on your hands? Take the 25-minute ranger-guided tour of Winsor Castle. While not as stately as the British Windsor Castle, this Mormon stronghold is an impressive fortified ranch built as a headquarters for tithing cattle and protection from raiding parties.

After seeing the main attractions, say hello to the horses and longhorn cattle in the corral, walk the half-mile trail, and wander through the collection of other historic buildings before bidding adieu. 

 

Hotels, Lodging & Camping

If you’re looking to stay a while, the Kaibab Band of Paiute Indians maintain a campground ¼ mile from the monument. Nearby Fredonia, Arizona also has campgrounds, and motels for those not looking to rough it.

Hours & Pricing

Open daily, 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Entrance Fees:

  • Adults (ages 16+): $7/day
  • Children (age 16 and younger): Free

 

For More Information

Pipe Spring National Monument
406 Pipe Spring Road
Fredonia, AZ 86022
928) 643-7105

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