Ash Fork

CHECK OUT THE MUSEUM OF THE MOTHER ROAD, ROUTE 66. ASH FORK IS PART OF THE LONGEST ORIGINAL SECTION OF ROUTE 66 – 92 MILES TO KINGMAN, ARIZONA, THAT PARALLELS THE RAILROAD – STILL IN EXISTENCE. 

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Follow the old-timey Burma Shave signs to Ash Fork, the historic hometown of Arizona State Historian Marshall Trimble. 

American Indians, Spanish conquistadors, fur trappers, and traders have all traversed Ash Fork. But Ash Fork got its big boost when the Atlanta and Pacific Railroad, the forerunner of the Santa Fe Railroad, came to town. The General Superintendent of the railroad gave it the name for its many ash trees.

West of Flagstaff, the high desert town of Ash Fork has the good fortune to be surrounded by national forests. But it also had the bad fortune of burning to the ground in 1893. Rebuilt by its industrious citizens, it came to be known as the “Flagstone Capital of the World” for the rock quarried for its bridges and buildings.

The Ash Fork Route 66 Museum, operated by the town’s active historical society, has an eclectic collection of objects displayed in indoor and outdoor exhibits, including a full-scale model of the now-defunct Escalante Hotel. And don’t forget to get your Route 66 passport stamped!

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Just The Facts

For Visitor information

Ash Fork Route 66 Museum | 518 Lewis Ave. | Ash Fork, AZ | (602) 637-2308 | www.ashforkrt66museum.com/museum.html

County It all started How High? Head Count
Yavapai 1882 5,138ft 396