Sedona, Arizona

Black Canyon City

Step out on the historic Black Canyon Trail, a former sheep-herding path.

Right Now

Less than an hour’s drive north of Phoenix, Black Canyon City hugs the Bradshaw Mountain along the Agua Fria River. But this desert city is much more than its picturesque location. It’s also got some pretty fun history and plenty of amazing hikes, too.

A convenient waypoint, the Black Canyon City area served as both a stage stop on the Phoenix to Prescott line in the late 1800s, and a military stopover between Fort Whipple and Fort Verde during Arizona’s Territorial days. The Kay Copper Mine, in operation until 1929, provided a livelihood for those who lived in the area.

The town’s Black Canyon Trail traces its roots back to the 1600s, when it was used as a livestock route. The trail gained official recognition in 1919, when the Department of the Interior designated it as a livestock driveway. Fun fact: It was mainly used by valley woolgrowers to herd their sheep.

Today the trailhead includes a picnic area, ramadas, restrooms, and parking. Stop by and enjoy a slice of Arizona’s nature at its finest. Once back in town, be sure to stop in at the nationally acclaimed Rock Springs Café for a slice of a different nature – a piece one of their heralded pies.

Visit City Site

Just The Facts

For Visitor information

Black Canyon City Chamber of Commerce | 33955 S. Old Black Canyon Hwy | Black Canyon City, AZ | (928) 669-6511 | www.blackcanyonaz.com

County It all started How High? Head Count
Yavapai 1966 2,000ft 2,837

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