Lake Powell & Glen Canyon

COME TO ONE OF THE MOST POPULAR LAKES IN ARIZONA – LAKE POWELL. IT’S A RELATIVELY NARROW, 186-MILE-LONG BODY OF WATER SET AMID THE DEEP CANYONS, ROCKY OUTCROPS, AND SPECTACULAR SCENERY OF THE GLEN CANYON NATIONAL RECREATION AREA. FORMED BY ONE OF THE WORLD’S HIGHEST DAMS AND THE WATERS OF THE COLORADO RIVER, THE LAKE BOASTS A SURFACE AREA OF 162,700 ACRES AND 1,960 MILES OF MEANDERING SHORELINE – MAKING IT THE PERFECT DESTINATION FOR FISHING, WATERSPORTS, PHOTOGRAPHY, AND ALL THINGS OUTDOORS.

History & Nature

You might not think events from millions of years ago impact your day, but when you take a trip to Glen Canyon, you’ll marvel at the shape the landscape took. Over the years, erosion from the Colorado River formed the canyon. A combo of volcanic lava, erosion from water and wind created bulbous rock formations you can’t find anywhere else.

Glen Canyon Dam was constructed in the early 1960s, which led to the formation of Lake Powell at the intersection of the Escalante, San Juan, and Colorado rivers. The waters rose steadily for the following 17 years, and since that time the lake level has fluctuated with the seasons.

 

Right Now

Things to Do

Fishing. Watersports. Photography. And so much more.

Lake Powell is one of the best-known spots for fishing in Arizona, with an abundance of game fish thriving in its clear waters. From bass to crappie, walleye and catfish, Lake Powell fishing offers plenty of fun for new and experienced anglers.

When you’re ready for high adrenaline adventure, put the poles away and break out the sports gear – this is also a great spot for wakeboarding, water skiing, and tubing. You can bring your own boat, or rent one when you arrive.

In the evening, picture this: a rich orange and purple sunset streaming through the unique rock formations providing extra glamour and drama to your photographs of this lake within a canyon. Since it’s dinner time for the residents, you might even snap a shot capturing some wildlife.

At the end of the day, you can kick back at your campsite, or tuck in to your rented houseboat and watch the rest of the magnificent sunset.

 

Hotels, Lodging & Camping

If you’re not staying on a houseboat, camping is an incredible way to enjoy the beauty of the shoreline. There’s a National Park Service campground at Lees Ferry, as well as privately run campgrounds and a lodge at Wahweap Marina. If you’re looking for more of a land-based stay, you’ll find several hotel options available in Page, just a few miles away.

Hours & Pricing

Launch Ramp: 

  • Open daily, year-round, lake levels permitting. 

Glen Canyon National Recreation Area: 

  • Open daily, year-round. Marinas may have reduced services during the winter months
  • Please visit the website for more information

Glen Canyon National Recreation Area Headquarters: 

  • Open Monday – Friday, 7 a.m. – 4 p.m., closed Thanksgiving, Christmas Day, and New Year’s Day 

 

Park Entrance Fees:

  • Per Vehicle: $20/7-day pass
  • Individual/Bicycle: $10/7-day pass

Camping Fees:

  • Lees Ferry Campground: $16/night
  • Stanton Creek, Hite, Farley Canyon, and Dirty Devil Campground: $8/night
  • Lone Rock Beach Campground: $12/night
  • Glen Canyon NRA Backcountry, Primitive Camping: Free

Vessel Fees:

  • Per Vessel: $20/7-day pass

 

For More Information


(928) 608-6200

Visit Destination webSite