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Monuments & Sites

For more than a thousand years, American Indians inhabited much of the present-day state of Arizona. Ruins of villages and ancient structures in the northern, southern and central regions of the state attest to the ingenuity of original settlers.

The five-story Montezuma Castle, a 20-room cliff dwelling located in the Verde Valley, served as a "high-rise apartment building" for Sinagua Indians more than 600 years ago. Meanwhile, Central Arizona’s Casa Grande, also known as "Big House," is one of the largest and most mysterious prehistoric buildings ever constructed. Both sites are among the best preserved American Indian structures in North America.

Contemporary American Indian tribes have continued many of the traditions of their ancestors. Artisans from the Hopi Tribe still handcraft the popular Katsina carvings, which are used in tribal ceremonies during different times of the year. Exploring Arizona's tribal lands can reveal many more cultural aspects of tribes both old and new to the state. See our complete list of American Indian monuments and sites here:

  • Navajo National Monument (Keet Seel, Betatakin)

    Keet Seel is built into an eye-shaped cave and accessible only by a strenuous 17-mile round trip hike and a climb up to the ruins. Betatakin is more accessible.

  • Navajo Nation Veterans Memorial

  • Navajo Code Talkers Exhibit

  • Kinishba Ruins

  • McDowell Sonoran Preserve

  • Montezuma Castle National Monument

    Discover this historic five-story Native American dwelling carved out of an ancient limestone cliff with twenty rooms. Begun during the twelfth century, it took about three centuries to complete.

  • Montezuma Well

    This limestone sink was a water source for the Sinagua and Hohokam people who lived and farmed in this area thousands of years ago. Traces of their ancient irrigation ditches may be seen in the picnic area.

  • Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park

  • Tuzigoot National Monument

  • Walnut Canyon National Monument

    Walk in the footsteps of people who lived at Walnut Canyon more than 700 years ago. Peer into their homes, cliff dwellings built deep within canyon walls. The presence of water in a dry land made the canyon rare and valuable to its early human inhabita

  • Poston Memorial Monument

    This monument marks the site of the Poston War Relocation Center where 17,867 people of Japanese ancestry, most of whom were United States citizens, were interned during World War II.

  • Tonto National Monument

    Shallow caves shelter nearly 700-year-old masonry dwellings at Tonto National Monument. These well-preserved ruins were home for three centuries to the Salado people.

  • Homolovi State Park

    Originally home to the Hisat'sinom (known to archaeologists as the Anasazi) in the 14th century, the Homolovi Ruins is now a center of research and preservation of Native American migration.

  • Hawley Lake

    Tucked away in Arizona’s White Mountains and surrounded by three national forests, Hawley Lake is an adventurist’s delight. The 260-acre lake is open year-round despite snowy winters, meaning it’s the ideal location for ice fishing and snowshoeing. During the breezy spring months, visit Hawley Lake for sail boating, canoeing, kayaking, camping and cabin rentals.

  • Navajo Nation Council Chamber

    The Navajo Nation Council Chamber, located in Window Rock, Arizona, is the single most significant building in the United States symbolizing the New Deal revolution in federal Indian policy.

  • Ahakhav Tribal Preserve

    The Ahakhav Tribal Preserve, located just outside Parker, was established in 1995 and currently consists of 1,253 acres of wilderness area and a 3.5-acre park. The preserve is centered around a reconstructed Colorado River backwater, which offers a variety of activities including fishing, canoeing, birding and swimming.

  • Alchesay-Williams Creek National Fish Hatchery Complex Ft. Apache

    The White Mountains of eastcentral Arizona are home to the Alchesay-Williams Creek National Fish Hatchery Complex. It is located on home lands of the White Mountain Apache Tribe – the Fort Apache Indian Reservation. This hatchery complex exists primarily for trout – and has become very important to an endemic fish, the golden-colored Apache trout.

  • Casa Grande Ruins National Monument

    Casa Grande Ruins National Monument preserves an Ancient Sonoran Desert People farming community and "Great House." Created as the nation’s first archeological reserve in 1892, the site was declared a National Monument in 1918.

  • Fort Apache Historic Park

    Located in the Fort Apache Historic Park, Nohwike’ Bágowa (House of Our Footprints) is the place to experience Apache history and culture. Housed in a modern facility constructed to reflect a gowa, our traditional holy home, the cultural center and museum is committed to the celebration and perpetuation of the Apache heritage.

  • Four Corners Monument

    Stand in four states at one time at Four Corners Monument, situated on the Navajo Nation in Northern Arizona. Unique amongst Arizona’s many landmarks, Four Corners Monument is the only place in the United States where four states intersect at one point: Arizona, New Mexico, Utah and Colorado.

  • Mission San Xavier del Bac

  • Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park

    One of the grandest – and most photographed – landmarks in the United States, Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park is a sprawling, sandy preserve that spans the border between Arizona and Utah, bathing the region in rich red hues. Dominated by crimson mesas and surreal sandstone towers – some as tall as 1,000 feet – the area is also known for dramatic, mesmerizing lighting, with the sun illuminating the towers and casting long shadows on the valley floor.

    Located inside the Navajo Nation – one of the largest Native American tribes in the United States – Monument Valley is around four hours northeast of Flagstaff, near the Four Corners area.

  • San Carlos Lake

    San Carlos is one of eight lakes with desert surroundings created by damming rivers in the hills around Phoenix, and like the others it has quite a dramatic setting. Deep blue waters are framed by gaunt, rocky, cactus-speckled mountains – in this case, the foothills of the Gila, Mescal and Santa Teresa ranges.

  • Rainbow Bridge National Monument

    Rainbow Bridge is the world's largest known natural bridge. The span has undoubtedly inspired people throughout time--from the neighboring American Indian tribes who consider Rainbow Bridge sacred, to the 300,000 people from around the world who visit it each year.

  • Tsaile Lake Navajo Nation Department of Fish and Wildlife

    Behind Diné College, at the intersection of Navajo Route Seven and the Lukachukai-Window Rock road, Tsaile Lake in Chinle was constructed as a flood control dam at the head of Canyon Del Muerto.

  • Tuzigoot National Monument

    Visit Tuzigoot National Monument and witness the incredible legacy of a people who live in the Verde Valley 1,000 years ago.

  • Wheatfields Lake Navajo Nation Department of Fish and Wildlife

    Wheatfields Lake in Chinle is one of the most popular destinations for fishing, camping, picnics and other outdoor adventures in Navajoland. You can cast your line just a few feet off the road, or you can drive around to the opposite side of the lake and launch your fishing boat near the base of the Chuska Mountains.

  • Wupatki National Monument

    Less than 800 years ago, Wupatki Pueblo was the largest pueblo around. It flourished for a time as a meeting place of different cultures. Yet this was one of the warmest and driest places on the Colorado Plateau, offering little obvious food, water, or comfor

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