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The Old West

If you're an Old West enthusiast, you've come to the right place. Not only did some of the Wild West's most famous events happen right here, but you'll also find countless preserved towns, cities and sites that tell the Old West story here.

Back before statehood, the Arizona Territory was home to some of the most feared outlaws and respected lawmen who walked the streets, from Bisbee's Brewery Gulch to Prescott's Whiskey Row. During its heyday as a tough mining town, the New York Times called Tombstone's Birdcage Theater, "the wildest, roughest, wickedest honky-tonk between Basin Street and the Barbary Coast," while the New York Sun once labeled Jerome, another mining town, the "wickedest town in the West."

Across the state, the Old West lives on in Arizona. Start your trip in Southern Arizona, home to Tombstone, Bisbee and Douglas. But you'll also want to make time for Wickenburg, in Central Arizona, as well as Jerome and Prescott – two towns connected by 30 miles of hair-raising bends and turns along Highway 89A – in North Central Arizona. 

Wherever you go, you'll find an Old West that's still very much alive, with countless historic hotels, quaint shops and more. You'll also discover plenty of attractions, from tours to re-enactments, to keep the whole family engaged. For more information about the Old West, visit Arizona Heritage Traveler – or read on for our listings. 

  • Amerind Foundation Museum

  • Arizona Capitol Museum

    1901 Capitol building with period offices restored to look the way they did at Statehood. Open weekdays 9 a.m.–4 p.m., Open Saturdays 10:00 am – 2:00 pm (Sept-May). Closed State Holidays.&nb

  • Arizona Historical Society Pioneer Museum

    The museum is adjacent to the school grounds and is located in the historic Coconino County hospital, a 1908 building made of tufa stone. Operated by the Pioneers Society of Arizona, this facility has artifacts pertaining to pioneer life in Arizona.

  • Bird Cage Theater Museum

    In the 1880s it was not only a theater, but also served as a saloon, gambling hall and brothel. The New York Times called it, "the wildest, roughest, wickedest honky tonk between Basin Street and the Barbary Coast."

  • Casa Grande Valley Historical Society Museum

    Experience the rich heritage of rural southern Arizona and see what Casa Grande looked like in 1879 when the railroad ended here.

  • Cave Creek Museum

    Indian artifacts from the Hohokam, Apache and Yavapai are displayed in this small community museum along with exhibits about pioneer history, ranching and mining.

  • Desert Caballeros Western Museum

    The fine art collection includes works by well-known artists, including Frederic Remington and George Phippen. The Hall of History brings the Old West to life with artifacts displayed in realistic period settings.

  • Slaughter Ranch Museum

    A National Historic Landmark, the old adobe ranch house has been restored along with several outbuildings. Visitors can tour the icehouse, wash house, granary, commissary, and a car shed to understand about life in southern Arizona at the turn of the 2

  • John Wesley Powell Memorial Museum

    Dedicated to telling the story of John Wesley Powell's 1869 and 1871 journeys down the Grand Canyon, the museum presents exhibits and memorabilia about those two monumental feats.
  • Phippen Museum of Western Art

    This art museum mounts three-to-five rotating exhibits during that year that showcase western art. The Phippen Museum puts on a popular show and sale over the Memorial Day weekend.

  • Phoenix Museum of History

    Located in Heritage and Science Park, the museum tells the story of Phoenix and the Salt River Valley beginning with the Hohokam. Also featured is the pioneer, pre-statehood period.
  • Rex Allen Museum

    Willcox celebrates its native son, the singing cowboy Rex Allen, with this small museum that features memorabilia about his career making movies, records and appearing on TV. The collection also includes exhibits of other western stars.
  • Sedona Heritage Museum

    The first room of the museum tells the stories of Sedona's pioneers. A second room is devoted to movies that were filmed in Sedona, many of which were western films. A third room describes the cowboy life.

  • The Museum of Rim Country Archaeology

  • Boothill

    Read the epitaphs as you wander through this small cemetery that is a tourist destination visitors pay to enter. (The real Boothill cemetery is nearby and free).
  • Butterfield Stagecoach Station

  • Copper Queen Mine Tour

    This is largest and most complete tour of one of Arizona’s oldest copper mines. Visitors are issued hard hats, slickers, and miner’s headlamps before taking the underground train deep into the Copper Queen Mine. Retired miners narrate the tour and

  • Douglas Historic Business District and Church Square

    Founded in 1901 as a site for a copper smelter, Douglas boasts 405 buildings on the National Register of Historic Places. Some of the most famous buildings include the historic Gadsden Hotel, the EP & SW Railroad Depot, which is now the police station,

  • El Tovar

    El Tovar is perhaps the most distinguished accommodation offered within Grand Canyon National Park. Located 20 feet from the South Rim, this rustic lodge with a large porch offers thrilling views of the canyon and wonderful people-watching opportunitie

  • Fort Bowie National Historic Site

    Fort Bowie tells the story of the conflict between the Chiricahua Apaches and the U.S. Army.

  • Gadsden Hotel

    Established in 1907, the five-story Gadsdsen Hotel at one time epitomized the glamour of the Old West. The lobby is considered one of the most opulent early 20th century public areas in Arizona.
  • Grand Canyon Railway

  • Hassayampa Inn

    Prescott residents raised the money to build the four-story hotel to attract Phoenix tourists who wanted to escape the summer heat. It was designed by one of the Southwest’s most distinguished architects, Henry Trost, and opened in 1927.

  • La Posada

    Constructed between 1928-1930, La Posada was Mary Elizabeth Jane Colter’s favorite design; completed it when she was 60 years old. The 75-room luxury hotel opened May 15, 1930 as the last of the Fred Harvey Company hotels built by the Santa Fe Ra

  • O.K. Corral

    Here, in 1881, the Earp brothers, Wyatt, Virgil and Morgan, along with their friend Doc Holliday, faced off against the Clanton and McLaury gang.

  • Southern Pacific Train Depot

    Now restored and used as the City Hall of Willcox, the depot was built in 1881 and is the only surviving original on-site passenger depot that is still extant on the southern transcontinental route through Arizona.
  • Strawberry Schoolhouse

    The Strawberry Schoolhouse is the oldest schoolhouse in Arizona still standing on its original site.
  • Tombstone

  • Tortilla Flat

  • Tombstone Livery Stable and Chuckwagon

    The name "Tombstone" is world-famous for the Earps, the cowboys and the "gunfight at the OK Corral."  The Tombstone Livery Stable and Chuckwagon is a horse boarding and training facility that offers mounted shooting competitions and a cowboy actio

  • The Postal History Foundation

    The Postal History Foundation has the only formal museum and library in the Southwest dedicated to U.S. Western postal history. It celebrates the historical settlement of the West through the remarkable stories of the Pony Express,historic postal stations
  • Rose Tree Museum & Gifts

    In the pation of an 1885 hotel is the world's largest Rose Bush--planted in 1885 the bush now covers over 8000 square feet, more than 300 people can be seated in its shade. The old hotel is a museum dedicted to one of tombstone's pioneer families and con
  • Millville and Rock Art Discovery Trail

  • Tombstone Western Heritage Museum

    A walk through Tombstone's past! Tombstone Western Heritage Museum celebrates the most famous Western town's history with an extensive collection of original artifacts, photos and documents. We feature the largest collection of Wyatt Earp an Tombston

  • Hi Jolly Monument

    Hadji Ali (Hi Jolly) came from his native Syria as a camel driver after Naval Lieutenant Edward Fitzgerald Beale convinced Secretary of War Jefferson Davis to authorize the formation of the Camel Military Corps in 1853. The monument marks Hi Jolly's grave
  • Castle Dome Mines Museum

    The Castle Dome Mines Museum is located 30 miles north of Yuma in the ghost town of Castle Dome. Once a thriving industrial town bustling with more than 3,000 inhabitants, Castle Dome is now a deserted town-turned-museum filled with rich Arizona histor

  • Heard Museum

    The scope of the museum emphasizes the lifeways of indigenous people of the southwest, but the museum collection and exhibitions cover the living cultures and arts of all contemporary Native peoples.Throughout the year, the museum hosts popular events&

  • Rawhide at Wild Horse Pass

    Arizona's largest Western-themed attraction in a new location, Wild Horse Pass. Stagecoach & train rides, gold panning, gunfights, shops, steakhouse, cookouts and live country music. Free admission.

  • Chiricahua National Monument

    Called the “Land of Standing Up Rocks” by the Apache Indians, Chiricahua National Monument envelops almost 12,000 acres of Arizona nature. Located in Southern Arizona, near the town of Willcox, Arizona, and around 90 miles from Tucson, travelers come from all over to experience this site of unique rock formations and Arizona history.

  • Pipe Spring National Monument

    American Indians, Mormon pioneers, plants, animals and others have depended on the life-giving water found at Pipe Spring. Learn about the lives of both the Kaibab Paiutes and the pioneers at the Visitor Center and Museum, take a guided tour of an historic fort, witness living history demonstrations, or simply meander at your own pace around the grounds.

  • McFarland State Historic Park

    McFarland State Historic Park has re-opened as a state park and Visitor Center, and is operated by the Florence Main Street Program and the Town of Florence .  Exhibits focus on the period of pre-statehood in Arizona. The museum is housed in a seven-room adobe structure that was built in 1878 as a courthouse.

  • Riordan Mansion State Historic Park

    Architect Charles E. Whittlesey designed this elaborate duplex mansion for the Riordan brothers, their wives and children. The 40-room home was built in 1904 and is among the best examples of Craftsman-style architecture in the state.

  • Tombstone Courthouse State Historic Park

    The Courthouse, built in 1882, contains exhibits with antiques and artifacts describing life in Tombstone in the 1880s.

  • Yuma Territorial Prison State Historic Park

    As Arizona Territory's first prison, Yuma Territorial Prison State Historic Park is rich with Old West lore and Arizona history. In the prison's 33 years of operation, a total of 3,069 prisoners, including 29 women, lived within the prison.

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